Of Ancient Fables Part LXXXV

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Fox and the Stork:

At one time the Fox and the Stork were on visiting terms and seemed very good friends. So the Fox invited the Stork to dinner, and for a joke put nothing before her but some soup in a very shallow dish. This the Fox could easily lap up, but the Stork could only wet the end of her long bill in it, and left the meal as hungry as when she began. “I am sorry,” said the Fox, “the soup is not to your liking.”

“Pray do not apologise,” said the Stork. “I hope you will return this visit, and come and dine with me soon.” So a day was appointed when the Fox should visit the Stork; but when they were seated at table all that was for their dinner was contained in a very long-necked jar with a narrow mouth, in which the Fox could not insert his snout, so all he could manage to do was to lick the outside of the jar.

“I will not apologise for the dinner,” said the Stork:

“One bad turn deserves another.”

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXXIV

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Fox, the Cock, and the Dog:

“Good news, good news!” he cried.

“Why, what is that?” said the Cock.

“King Lion has declared a universal truce. No beast may hurt a bird henceforth, but all shall dwell together in brotherly friendship.”

“Why, that is good news,” said the Cock; “and there I see some one coming, with whom we can share the good tidings.” And so saying he craned his neck forward and looked afar off.

“What is it you see?” said the Fox.

“It is only my master’s Dog that is coming towards us. What, going so soon?” he continued, as the Fox began to turn away as soon as he had heard the news. “Will you not stop and congratulate the Dog on the reign of universal peace?”

“I would gladly do so,” said the Fox, “but I fear he may not have heard of King Lion’s decree.”

Cunning often outwits itself

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXXIII

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Fox Without a Tail:

It happened that a Fox caught its tail in a trap, and in struggling to release himself lost all of it but the stump. At first he was ashamed to show himself among his fellow foxes. But at last he determined to put a bolder face upon his misfortune, and summoned all the foxes to a general meeting to consider a proposal which he had to place before them. When they had assembled together the Fox proposed that they should all do away with their tails. He pointed out how inconvenient a tail was when they were pursued by their enemies, the dogs; how much it was in the way when they desired to sit down and hold a friendly conversation with one another. He failed to see any advantage in carrying about such a useless encumbrance.

“That is all very well,” said one of the older foxes; “but I do not think you would have recommended us to dispense with our chief ornament if you had not happened to lose it yourself.”

Distrust interested advice

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXXII

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Frog and the Ox:

“Oh Father,” said a little Frog to the big one sitting by the side of a pool, “I have seen such a terrible monster! It was as big as a mountain, with horns on its head, and a long tail, and it had hoofs divided in two.”

“Tush, child, tush,” said the old Frog, “that was only Farmer White’s Ox. It isn’t so big either; he may be a little bit taller than I, but I could easily make myself quite as broad; just you see.” So he blew himself out, and blew himself out, and blew himself out. “Was he as big as that?” asked he.

“Oh, much bigger than that,” said the young Frog.

Again the old one blew himself out, and asked the young one if the Ox was as big as that.

“Bigger, father, bigger,” was the reply.

So the Frog took a deep breath, and blew and blew and blew, and swelled and swelled and swelled. And then he said: “I’m sure the Ox is not as big as this. But at this moment he burst.

Self-conceit may lead to self-destruction

 

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXXI

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Young Thief and His Mother:

A young Man had been caught in a daring act of theft and had been condemned to be executed for it. He expressed his desire to see his Mother, and to speak with her before he was led to execution, and of course this was granted. When his Mother came to him he said: “I want to whisper to you,” and when she brought her ear near him, he nearly bit it off. All the bystanders were horrified, and asked him what he could mean by such brutal and inhuman conduct. “It is to punish her,” he said. “When I was young I began with stealing little things, and brought them home to Mother. Instead of rebuking and punishing me, she laughed and said: “It will not be noticed.” It is because of her that I am here to-day.”

“He is right, woman,” said the Priest; “the Lord hath said:

Train up a child in the way he should go; and when he is
old he will not depart therefrom

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXX

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Woodman and the Serpent:

One wintry day a Woodman was tramping home from his work when he saw something black lying on the snow. When he came closer he saw it was a Serpent to all appearance dead. But he took it up and put it in his bosom to warm while he hurried home. As soon as he got indoors he put the Serpent down on the hearth before the fire. The children watched it and saw it slowly come to life again. Then one of them stooped down to stroke it, but the Serpent raised its head and put out its fangs and was about to sting the child to death. So the Woodman seized his axe, and with one stroke cut the Serpent in two. “Ah,” said he,

“No gratitude from the wicked.”

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXIX

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing:

A Wolf found great difficulty in getting at the sheep owing to the vigilance of the shepherd and his dogs. But one day it found the skin of a sheep that had been flayed and thrown aside, so it put it on over its own pelt and strolled down among the sheep. The Lamb that belonged to the sheep, whose skin the Wolf was wearing, began to follow the Wolf in the Sheep’s clothing; so, leading the Lamb a little apart, he soon made a meal off her, and for some time he succeeded in deceiving the sheep, and enjoying hearty meals.

Appearances are deceptive

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXVIII

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Wolf and the Lamb:

Once upon a time a Wolf was lapping at a spring on a hillside, when, looking up, what should he see but a Lamb just beginning to drink a little lower down. “There’s my supper,” thought he, “if only I can find some excuse to seize it.” Then he called out to the Lamb, “How dare you muddle the water from which I am drinking?”

“Nay, master, nay,” said Lambikin; “if the water be muddy up there, I cannot be the cause of it, for it runs down from you to me.”

“Well, then,” said the Wolf, “why did you call me bad names this time last year?”

“That cannot be,” said the Lamb; “I am only six months old.”

“I don’t care,” snarled the Wolf; “if it was not you it was your father;” and with that he rushed upon the poor little Lamb and ate her all up. But before she died she gasped out:

“Any excuse will serve a tyrant.”

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXVII

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Wolf and the Kid:

A Kid was perched up on the top of a house, and looking down saw a Wolf passing under him. Immediately he began to revile and attack his enemy. “Murderer and thief,” he cried, “what do you here near honest folks’ houses? How dare you make an appearance where your vile deeds are known?” “Curse away, my young friend,” said the Wolf.

It is easy to be brave from a safe distance

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXVI

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Wolf and the Crane:

A Wolf had been gorging on an animal he had killed, when suddenly a small bone in the meat stuck in his throat and he could not swallow it. He soon felt terrible pain in his throat, and ran up and down groaning and groaning and seeking for something to
relieve the pain. He tried to induce every one he met to remove the bone. “I would give anything,” said he, “if you would take it out.” At last the Crane agreed to try, and told the Wolf to lie on his side and open his jaws as wide as he could. Then the Crane put its long neck down the Wolf’s throat, and with its beak loosened the bone, till at last it got it out.

“Will you kindly give me the reward you promised?” said the Crane.

The Wolf grinned and showed his teeth and said: “Be content. You have put your head inside a Wolf’s mouth and taken it out again in safety; that ought to be reward enough for you.”

Gratitude and greed go not together

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXV

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Wind and the Sun:

The Wind and the Sun were disputing which was the stronger. Suddenly they saw a traveller coming down the road, and the Sun said: “I see a way to decide our dispute. Whichever of us can cause that traveller to take off his cloak shall be regarded as the stronger. You begin.” So the Sun retired behind a cloud, and the Wind began to blow as hard as it could upon the traveller. But the harder he blew the more closely did the traveller wrap his cloak round him, till at last the Wind had to give up in despair. Then the Sun came out and shone in all his glory upon the
traveller, who soon found it too hot to walk with his cloak on.

Kindness effects more than severity

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXIV

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Two Pots:

Two Pots had been left on the bank of a river, one of brass, and one of earthenware. When the tide rose they both floated off down the stream. Now the earthenware pot tried its best to keep aloof from the brass one, which cried out:

“Fear nothing, friend, I will not strike you.”

“But I may come in contact with you,” said the other, “if I come too close; and whether I hit you, or you hit me, I shall suffer for it.”

The strong and the weak cannot keep company

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXIII

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Two Fellows and the Bear:

Two Fellows were travelling together through a wood, when a Bear rushed out upon them. One of the travellers happened to be in front, and he seized hold of the branch of a tree, and hid himself among the leaves. The other, seeing no help for it, threw
himself flat down upon the ground, with his face in the dust. The Bear, coming up to him, put his muzzle close to his ear, and sniffed and sniffed. But at last with a growl he shook his head and slouched off, for bears will not touch dead meat. Then the fellow in the tree came down to his comrade, and, laughing, said

“What was it that Master Bruin whispered to you?”

“He told me,” said the other:

Never trust a friend who deserts you at a pinch

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXII

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Two Crabs:

One fine day two Crabs came out from their home to take a stroll on the sand.

“Child,” said the mother, “you are walking very ungracefully. You should accustom yourself, to walking straight forward without twisting from side to side.”

“Pray, mother,” said the young one, “do but set the example yourself, and I will follow you.”

Example is the best precept

 

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

Of Ancient Fables Part LXXI

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These are ancient fables by an Ethiopian Slave called Aesop which strangely enough still very fitting in our modern world.

As I like stories even short ones I thought I’d include them here out of fun and as a reminder to our modern world that such stories came first before the advent of Television, Film and Computers. Storytelling is becoming a lost art today which should be kept alive.

This is Aesop’s Fable, The Trumpeter Taken Prisoner:

A Trumpeter during a battle ventured too near the enemy and was captured by them. They were about to proceed to put him to death when he begged them to hear his plea for mercy.

“I do not fight,” said he, “and indeed carry no weapon; I only blow this trumpet, and surely that cannot harm you; then why should you kill me?”

“You may not fight yourself,” said the others, “but you encourage and guide your men to the fight.”

Words may be deeds.

Please note: If  want to see my second life journal then go to the Journal of a Spectral Traveller.

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